WEEKEND POST 158

From the Author

I guess you could call my spreadsheet bookkeeping next-level neurotic. But to wrap both the Christmas gifts + the year’s finances before December ends is totally worth celebrating.

Annnnd by celebrate, I mean nestle into a warm pile of blankets on the couch with the cats, a good book, mellow tunes + a deep glass of something delicious, because my 2017 travels — work only — topped 9,250 miles. That’s longer than a straight line from here to Antarctica!

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Pola Pola Kolačiči (Croatian “Half + Half Cookies”)

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Each year I hold on to our family tradition of exploring the foods of a different culture during the holidays, and Pola Pola Kolačiči is a new recipe on its way to becoming an old classic.

These Croatian cookies (kolačiči) take jammy thumbprints to the next level: One half (pola) studded with poppy seeds, the other half (pola) bathed in espresso + glistening with cinnamon sugar. Where the two meet, a dot of pear cardamom butter — a favorite wintry flavor pair — adds a little something extra. Plus, of course, all the crumbly, buttery goodness you expect of a Christmas cookie.

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WEEKEND POST 157

From the Author

Do you have snow? Opening up to the world on social media this morning we found that every other location we once called home — including the Gulf coasts of both Texas and Florida — received at least a festive dusting, and here we are damp + dreary with blowing, spitty, gross rain that hasn’t let up for two days. D’oh.

Inside, the fireplace is getting a workout, the Holiday Stream is queued up, and the homemade gift preparations have finally commenced. For supper, wintry pear + sage stuffed turkey burgers with caramelized onions on focaccia, a green salad + a new Chardonnay, followed (hopefully) by popcorn + a Christmas movie!

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Mole Marrón

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Mexican mole is a sauce with a big, complicated personality.

With an elaborate combination of toasting, grinding + slow-simmering upwards of 40 ingredients, the flavors of mole are unsurprisingly deep + complex. Made with dried chiles, aromatic veg, spices + herbs, often bittersweet chocolate or cocoa, and ground nuts or seeds to thicken (but also sometimes stale bread, plantain or tomatoes), it is an extraordinary blend of earthy, smoky, sweet and spicy.

Some believe mole comes from the Spanish word moler, meaning “to grind.” Others believe it’s derived from the Nahuatl, or Aztec, word molli, meaning “mixture” or simply, “sauce.” Seven classic variations of the sauce reign in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, where mole is said to be the culinary symbol.

For us, it’s come to say Thanksgiving.

Mole sauce

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