Pickled Cranberries with Rosemary + Orange

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

I’m probably among a small, strange group of folks who have “visit a cranberry bog” on their bucket lists.

Possibly some kind of territorial predisposition having grown up in Wisconsin, I dream of an early autumn road trip to experience the sights, sounds, smells, tastes + feels (read: wade into) the picturesque seas of floating crimson red berries scattered across the state’s central and northern landscape offer during harvest.

Until that day, we’ll continue to amass a small freezer cache each November, happily snacking on, cooking + baking with, and creating new recipes to spread love about this traditionally winter-holidays-only fruit until the next season.

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Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Jingle Bells

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

We know some of my husband’s thoughts on dessert, but ask for his Christmas must-have: “Mom’s peanut butter balls.”

There were literal gasps of disbelief when I confessed that these oh-so-sweet, chocolate-drenched treats were completely unknown to me until trading my last name for his. And during our first holiday with his family it became apparent that — like my mum’s kringle — they’re essential to the dessert table, and relatives practically mutiny if absent.

No doubt hers will forever remain the best in his eyes, but for the years we’re not able to make it home to Wisconsin, it’s up to me to keep Christmas traditions alive.

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Browned Butter Pomegranate Rose Madeleines

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Anatole France, a French poet, journalist, and Nobel Prize-winning novelist, once remarked: “Life is too short and Proust is too long.”

Published in a series of seven volumes between the years 1913 and 1927, Marcel Proust’s novel Remembrance of Things Past is a narrated telling of his own (fictionalized) life story. More than 4,000 pages, it is indeed a very challenging read. His allegorical search for truth is defined by the concept of “involuntary memory” — literally, spontaneous remembrances of things past, flashbacks, triggered by everyday actions, sights, sounds, tastes, smells.

The most famous of Proust’s literary recollections, an evocation of a profound childhood remembrance upon tasting a crumbly, tea-dipped madeleine.*

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