Mole Marrón

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Mexican mole is a sauce with a big, complicated personality.

With an elaborate combination of toasting, grinding + slow-simmering upwards of 40 ingredients, the flavors of mole are unsurprisingly deep + complex. Made with dried chiles, aromatic veg, spices + herbs, often bittersweet chocolate or cocoa, and ground nuts or seeds to thicken (but also sometimes stale bread, plantain or tomatoes), it is an extraordinary blend of earthy, smoky, sweet and spicy.

Some believe mole comes from the Spanish word moler, meaning “to grind.” Others believe it’s derived from the Nahuatl, or Aztec, word molli, meaning “mixture” or simply, “sauce.” Seven classic variations of the sauce reign in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, where mole is said to be the culinary symbol.

For us, it’s come to say Thanksgiving.

Mole sauce

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Three Salads for Your Holiday Table

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Just one short week stands between us and the string of winter holidays beginning with Thanksgiving. As the planning commences, why not consider adding a salad to your menus?

This time of the year, when the days darken and the chill creeps in, I find the striking colors and flavors of the season to be an even more important part of the mealtime ritual — a kind of physical and mental reinvigoration. Beginning with good quality fresh, seasonal ingredients, these recipes offer balance and lightness to otherwise heavy meals. Not only that, each on its own is a balance of flavors, colors and textures, and could stand as a light lunch as well.

Show your festive tables and your guests a little extra love these holidays with something beautiful and healthy!

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Browned Butter Pomegranate Rose Madeleines

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Anatole France, a French poet, journalist, and Nobel Prize-winning novelist, once remarked: “Life is too short and Proust is too long.”

Published in a series of seven volumes between the years 1913 and 1927, Marcel Proust’s novel Remembrance of Things Past is a narrated telling of his own (fictionalized) life story. More than 4,000 pages, it is indeed a very challenging read. His allegorical search for truth is defined by the concept of “involuntary memory” — literally, spontaneous remembrances of things past, flashbacks, triggered by everyday actions, sights, sounds, tastes, smells.

The most famous of Proust’s literary recollections, an evocation of a profound childhood remembrance upon tasting a crumbly, tea-dipped madeleine.*

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Creamy Carrot Lentil Soup with Crunchy Almond-Coconut Dukkah

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

There are a few sections in my raised bed where the soil leaves quite a lot to be desired. I (un)affectionately refer to these as “dead zones,” and after seasons of disappointment, began to expect little, if any growth at all.

This past autumn and spring something spurred me to give the entire bed extra attention in the form of homemade compost tea, manure, and a new layer of peaty garden soil. Spread, till, spread, till, spread, till, wait.

Lo, and behold, a variety of carrots called Short ‘n Sweet came to represent not only the first carrots in my history of gardening, but also the first crop to outfox a dead zone. Though the size and harvest of these gnarly munchkins were small, it was a bounty considering, and proof of what the earth can provide if only we give it love.

Baby carrot harvest

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