Mondo Butter

Eat Well Edibles

Why commit to a single nut or seed for butter when you can have six in one?

Sweet cashews offset the mildly tannic walnuts. Macadamias are a rich splurge in all senses of the word, but they are so smooth and buttery, perfect for blending. Sesame adds its distinctive (and ironic) “nuttiness,” flax offers that hippie-earthy vibe, and because sunflower seeds can come off as bitter to some, a small amount adds to the creaminess and nutrition.

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Spicy 4-Seed Gingerbread Bites

Eat Well

Among the flavors that, for me, evoke nostalgia for the holidays, cinnamon and ginger dominate. The cozy-spicy duo is hard to beat — any time of the year — and even more so when the two merge in gooey, intense gingerbread bites with other warming spices, sticky dates, a hint of orange, plus four types of seeds.

I’m sharing these today not just to prolong my love of the winter season, but also because the ingredients show some serious love to your heart for American Heart Month.

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North Indian Rajma (Punjab-Style Kidney Bean Masala Stew)

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

The cuisine of the Northern Indian region of Punjab is often rich and hearty, always bold in every sense: taste, texture, colors, aromas. Rustic yet lavish dishes are cooked in ways that incorporate strong ingredients like onion, ginger and garlic with generous, but precise, amounts of spices to enhance and perfectly balance the flavors.

Among the best-known Punjabi dishes are channa masala, various veg + non-veg versions of tikka korma, and my favoritebaigan bharta. It’s also believed that tandoor cooking, and thus, tandoori chicken, originated here.

Digging deeper, I made a surprisingly excellent discovery — a darkhorse in the vast Indian menu that quickly won our hearts and minds. And stomachs.

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Browned Butter Pomegranate Rose Madeleines

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Anatole France, a French poet, journalist, and Nobel Prize-winning novelist, once remarked: “Life is too short and Proust is too long.”

Published in a series of seven volumes between the years 1913 and 1927, Marcel Proust’s novel Remembrance of Things Past is a narrated telling of his own (fictionalized) life story. More than 4,000 pages, it is indeed a very challenging read. His allegorical search for truth is defined by the concept of “involuntary memory” — literally, spontaneous remembrances of things past, flashbacks, triggered by everyday actions, sights, sounds, tastes, smells.

The most famous of Proust’s literary recollections, an evocation of a profound childhood remembrance upon tasting a crumbly, tea-dipped madeleine.*

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