Three Salads for Your Holiday Table

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Just one short week stands between us and the string of winter holidays beginning with Thanksgiving. As the planning commences, why not consider adding a salad to your menus?

This time of the year, when the days darken and the chill creeps in, I find the striking colors and flavors of the season to be an even more important part of the mealtime ritual — a kind of physical and mental reinvigoration. Beginning with good quality fresh, seasonal ingredients, these recipes offer balance and lightness to otherwise heavy meals. Not only that, each on its own is a balance of flavors, colors and textures, and could stand as a light lunch as well.

Show your festive tables and your guests a little extra love these holidays with something beautiful and healthy!

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A Simple Basic Tomato Sauce

Eat Well Edibles Grow Well Recipe

In an ideal world, my kitchen counters would overflow in late summer with vine-ripened tomatoes of all shapes and sizes and colors, picked that morning and still warm from the sun.

Though my thumb is arguably quite green, I am, at present, keeper of a garden routinely ravaged by an impressive array of creatures and forces of nature. Each season my tomato plants are the most spectacular failures. Plans to preserve the tastes of long-faded summer sunshine with jars stacked upon jars of whole tomatoes, tomato chutneys, fiery salsa and a killer homemade tomato sauce are shelved for ‘someday.’

For tomato sauce there is, thankfully, another way. Maybe even a better way.

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Tofu Scallion Brown Rice Onigiri

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Following my husband’s recent solo visit to Tokyo I thought, what fun to match it up with a recipe.

Many aspects of Japanese culture could be summarized as a balance of precision and minimalism. The approach to food is a delicious study of these contrasts. Traditional Japanese cuisine offers dishes that are beautiful and complex yet healthy and practical, exemplifying an effortlessly natural simplicity of diverse ingredients.

Onigiri — pronounced oh-knee-gree — are portable little bundles of rice often eaten as a snack or light lunch on-the-hoof. Nigiri means “to squeeze,” which is how onigiri are formed into the classic triangles, balls or cylinders — either by hand or with the help of shaped molds.

Some onigiri are filled with tasty surprises, like sashimi-grade tuna, salmon roe, avocado, or umeboshi (Japanese sour salted plums). Some have a strip of nori (dried seaweed) at the base to keep your hands free from the sticky rice, and some are wrapped entirely in nori or fresh shiso leaves. Other onigiri are just rice, but with seasonings mixed in prior to shaping or sprinkled on top after, perhaps furikake (a mixture of sesame seeds, nori and other seasonings), sakebushi (dried salmon flakes), or yukari (red shiso powder).

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Harvest Apple Chai Muffins

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Autumn is my season, and back home in the Wisconsin, it’s the most splendid season of all.

One of the traditions I miss most is driving north along country roads to the rolling, tree-dotted hills of The Little Farmer Orchard in Pipe. Rows and rows of apple trees as far as the eye can see. Twisted branches stretching skyward like gnarly fingers, each drooping slightly under the weight of juicy, white-fleshed Cortlands. A dazzling display of autumnal beauty.

Memories of these orchard afternoons are always on my mind come October. An apple-y sweet does nicely to satisfy some of the nostalgic longings. Traditionally this is an apple crisp with vanilla and lots of walnuts, but this year I dreamed up a spiced multi-grain apple muffin instead. (There’s still plenty of apple season to bake a tray of that crisp.)

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Homemade Jalapeño-Infused Salt

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

We both love spice and I regularly employ all sorts of hot peppers in the kitchen, but jalapeño receives the lion’s share of our attention. Never keen on letting fresh ingredients go to waste (nor exercising self-restraint in the garden or at the market when produce is in season + the price is right), I set off on an adventure to save the latest collection of chillies.

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